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Case Study #90

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Canine Seizures Unraveled

winchester

Roughly 1 in 26 (3.8%) people in the United States develop a form of epilepsy at some point in their life. The incidence of epilepsy/seizures in the general dog population is estimated to be between 0.5% and 5.7%. The traditional veterinarian belief system is that epilepsy in dogs is often an inherited condition.

There are three types of epilepsy in dogs: reactive, secondary, and primary. Reactive epileptic seizures are caused by metabolic issues, such as low blood sugar or kidney or liver failure. Epilepsy attributed to brain tumor, stroke or other trauma is known as secondary or symptomatic epilepsy. According to traditional veterinarian belief, there is no known cause for primary or idiopathic epilepsy, which is only diagnosed by eliminating other possible causes for the seizures.

The key to unraveling any medical issue whether it be in humans or animals is to define the underlying cause. This concept is foreign to most healthcare practitioners and veterinarians alike. A case in point was a 31/2 year old beagle named Winchester who suffered from seizures. All conventional veterinary testing failed to make a definitive diagnosis.

Utilizing the concepts of quantum testing, it was determined that Winchester had mercury in his brain. Heavy metal toxicity is a common occurrence in today's toxic environment. Heavy metals function as an antenna attracting electromagnetic frequencies (EMFs) into the brain causing inflammation and swelling. Selecting the appropriate treatment involves matching the energy pattern of remedy with that of the canine. Quantum testing determined that a homeopathic remedy, Metal-Chord, provided the best match for removing the underlying cause. After six weeks of treatment with the remedy, Winchester had no further epileptic seizures.

Utilizing medication to control seizures is like painting on rust. It may look pretty for a while but it is not solving the problem. Pet owners and practitioners must change their paradigm in order to solve their pet's health issues. Once the transformation occurs, the healing process becomes simplified.